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Bentley Mulsanne Grand Limousine by Mulliner

Posted in Bentley, Editorials, Extreme Luxury, Notorious with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2016 by 99MilesPerHour

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The iconic Bentley motorcar needs no dramatic rhetorical preface. It’s the ultra-luxury saloon for the enthusiast or connoisseur who desires to maintain a low profile. Each is a highly bespoke automotive masterpiece. The elite Bentley Mulsanne is the company flagship designed for discerning clientele that demands high-performance without sacrificing luxury. So…what about the aristocrat that wants even more? Enter stage right…Mulsanne Grand Limousine. This contemporary coachbuilt saloon is Bentley’s magnum opus –

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Bespoke…is Bentley, the two are synonymous. This is why one will never see two exactly alike. Natural materials and the skill of the coachbuilder yields a superlative among superlatives. Mulliner, Bentley’s in-house personal commissioning division works with the client to create a motorcar of distinction that is as unique as one’s own fingerprints.

The Mulsanne Grand Limousine is handbuilt by Mulliner in the grand tradition of this eminent coachbuilder. Unlike traditional “stretch” conversions, Mulliner designed the Grand Limousine to preserve the Mulsanne’s aesthetic purity. This is the longest manufacturer-built limousine in the world. Here’s another one-up for “Big Ben” against you-know-who…

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This resplendent custom crafted limousine retains its beauty as a Mulsanne saloon. Its added dimensions are cleverly built into the architecture. The 39.4” extension to the Mulsanne’s length is discretely added into the bodyshell using a custom crafted panel at the “B” pillars. The rear doors are enlarged to accommodate easier entry and exit to the passenger cabin.

Headroom has been increased by a 3.1” addition into the roof structure. The long, low, sweeping silhouette of the Mulsanne adapted beautifully to the transformation. Nothing appears added-on or out-of-place. The achievement of Mulliner’s coachcrafting makes the Mulsanne Grand Limousine look balanced and well-proportioned with poised dignity from any angle.

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Technology unobtrusively makes itself available to the posh rear passenger suite. The elegant inner world of the Mulsanne Grand Limousine spans beyond polished metal, supple hides, and hand finished veneers. There are many bespoke digital features to bring all the amenities of home to this very special saloon. There’s an intercom system to communicate with the driver. A unique electrochromic “Smart Glass” partition separating the rear suite from the driver’s compartment converts from transparent to opaque at the touch of a button.

The HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system designed and built by Mulliner enables each rear seat occupant to control their own temperature setting. With the highly bespoke nature of this distinguished saloon, there are myriad on-board computer and communication configurations available to fashion a rolling boardroom for the executive who must work while traveling.

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As far as comfort and convenience…the rear passenger suite houses four of the most desirable seats in the entire industry. The Mulsanne Grand Limousine rivals the luxury of a guest suite at the Burj Al Arab – the rear suite evokes serenity from the outside world with the richness of materials, contrast of color, and harmony of surfaces to provide tactile and visual stimulation. Ultra-exclusive aviation-inspired seating allows passengers to converse face to face. Each lounge seat is electrically controlled to adjust to each occupant’s desired setting; they are also heated and cooled.

There are crystal flutes and a wine bottle cooler located between the front facing seats. Between the rear facing seats is a soft drink cabinet with bespoke crystal tumblers. Mulliner Coachbuilders offers the exercise of choice. This decadently luxurious new offering is available to suit its owner. In order to create a new benchmark for the brand, Mulliner widened choices to infinity making the process of commissioning a most rewarding experience…just as Henry Jervis Mulliner (1870-1967), founder of the esteemed coachbuilding firm, intended it to be –

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The Mulsanne Grand Limousine is powered as no other limousine on the road today. Mulliner re-engineered the powertrain, transmission, chassis, and suspension to accommodate the longest ultra-luxury manufacturer-built saloon in the world. The formidable 6.8 litre aluminium twin-turbocharged V8 engine produces 530 hp with an astounding 1,100 Nm of peak torque to move this magnificent motorcar with aplomb. The chassis and suspension components are refined to withstand the added weight and high torque output of the high performance powerplant.

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The Mulliner coachbuilt Mulsanne Grand Limousine is a splendid highly bespoke motorcar. The pleasure of owning such a magnificent example of Mulliner automotive art is reveling in the fact that no other ultra-luxury saloon on the planet will ever be exactly the same…not even another Mulsanne Grand Limousine. For decades, Bentley is renowned for engineering and design excellence, exemplary craftsmanship, and quality led by a visionary approach.

These are the qualities one is entitled to expect of a Bentley motorcar. From the iconic flying “B” mascot engraved with the words “Coachbuilt by Mulliner” through the extraordinary coachcrafted bodywork…the Mulsanne Grand Limousine is the epitome of grandeur and elegance escalating the Bentley brand to new heights in exclusivity and supremacy in ultra-luxury motoring…a new era has begun –

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Photos courtesy Bentley Media

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2002 Bentley State Limousine for Queen Elizabeth II

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Welcome to Greg’s World of NotoriousLuxury…

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You Guessed it……Tash Majenta!

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on October 16, 2013 by 99MilesPerHour

now….which is your favorite?

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“Strike the pose……..VOGUE VOGUE VOGUE!”

Aston Martin Lagonda

Posted in Aston Martin, Editorials with tags , , , , on October 3, 2013 by 99MilesPerHour

Long, low-slung, svelte, lithe & muscular……………

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The Aston Martin Lagonda was a four-door luxury saloon built from 1974-1990. This car was either ‘liked’ or ‘hated’ there was no in between. The styling was controversial for the time. These hand-crafted saloons were among the most expensive cars in the world. The Lagonda was produced in four series in two distinct versions. The Lagonda was designed by British Designer William Towns. It was introduced when Aston Martin had financial issues. The car drew unusual interest and orders came during its introduction. It was described as having “an opulent club-like leather trimmed interior.”

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The Lagonda had the prestige of being the first production car in the world to use computer management and the first auto maker to install a digital instrument panel. Cathode ray tubes were used as well. The Lagonda, to me was a stunning saloon that took you by surprise. Its design was ahead of its time as I am sure that you can see the cars of today in the Lagonda’s silhouette. One journalist described the Lagonda’s appearance: “it looks as though it were living off of dinner mints and hot water.” Naughty. I looked at it as being a work of contemporary art. People back then wanted “fat” cars heavy-gas-guzzling cars. The Lagonda was lithe and muscular without an ounce of fat. Trim like an athlete, severe by all means, when the Lagonda was introduced we were still coming out of the “Ward & June Cleaver/Ozzie & Harriet Nelson Era!”

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Series I was made only one year from 1974-1975. It was merely a long wheelbase variant of the Aston Martin V8. The Series I debuted at the 1974 London Motor Show. This was the first car to wear the ‘Lagonda’ name since the 1961 Rapide. Only seven units were sold. The power came from a 5.3 litre DOHC V8 producing 280 bhp with 408 Nm of torque. The Series I had a top speed of 149 mph going from 0-60 in 6.2 seconds. (don’t you dare!)

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The Lagonda Series II had a new controversial wedge-shape. (be kind!) It was a striking new Lagonda that had innovative solid-state digital instrumentation. It was launched at the 1976 London Motor Show; however, deliveries didn’t begin until 1979. Production problems plagued this model. The Series II was fitted with technology that was at the time was “awkward” because it hadn’t existed in the real world long enough to refine such as Digital LED dashes with primitive touch-pad controls and gas plasma displays. The steering wheel mounted controls and gas plasma displays were dropped in 1980 due to the items being prone to failure. This Series sold for 49,933 GBP which was more than a Ferrari 400. This series was built from 1976-1985.

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The Series II used a variant of the 5.3 litre DOHC V8. The engine now produced 280 bhp @ 5,000 rpm with 409 Nm @ 3,000 peak torque. The top speed was 143 mph going from 0-60 mph in 8.8 seconds. (Gasp!)

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In 1983 five Series II Lagondas were upgraded with body kits and interiors. In 1984 four long wheelbase Lagondas were made as “Tickford Lagonda Limousines” at a price of 110,000 GBP each. The Tickford Lagonda was built in house at Aston Martin by their coach building division. These bespoke vehicles had high-end hi-fi systems (no one knew what current day surround-sound with DVD players or iPod Infotainment systems were back then!). They could be equipped with color TV both front & rear, video players and cocktail cabinets.

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The Tickford Lagonda Limousine

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The Series III Lagonda was made from 1986-1987. 75 Models were equipped with fuel injected engines. It originally had cathode ray tube instruments; later versions featured a vacuum fluorescent display

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The Series IV Lagonda was introduced at the 1987 Geneva Motor Show. The Series IV had a significant freshening by William Towns. The car’s sharp edges were rounded off and the pop-up headlamps were replaced by an arrangement of triple lights. 105 Series IV Lagondas were built. The last car was produced during January of 1990.

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A grand total of 645 Aston Martin Lagondas were built. It required 2,200 hours of manpower to build and only 25 were built per year for the US market. It will always hold a place in automotive history. It introduced technology that no other auto maker had done. It had highly extreme styling that either you liked it or hated it. Journalists have made rude comments about it and put it in such an ugly light. That is why I wanted to create a positive editorial to share with you. Regardless of what the others say…….it is still an Aston Martin!

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Bentley Mulliner Driving Specification

Posted in Bentley, Collector's Series with tags , , , on September 23, 2013 by 99MilesPerHour

“Step this way for another adventure in paradise………..”

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……………..NotoriousLuxury

Notoriously Rolls Royce

Posted in Rolls Royce with tags , , on September 8, 2013 by 99MilesPerHour

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